10 Unique Foreign Words to Add to Your Love Dictionary

Love, translated

Aug 31, 2017
The language of love (Expedia)

The language of love (Expedia)

Sometimes there’s so much you want to say to your partner or loved one, only you may not know the right words that convey exactly you’re feeling. Not anymore! Expedia created a dictionary of love phrases from different countries around the world that perfectly communicate a message that doesn’t quite exist in English.

While millions of people have experienced what it means to love someone, there’s no one right way to communicate these feelings. This dictionary, however, is a beautiful reminder that each culture has a unique--and equally beautiful--way of expressing these feelings.

MAMIHLAPINATAPEI

Language: Yagan
Where is it from: Chile
What does it mean: A meaningful, wordless look shared between two individuals who want to initiate something, but are scared to make the first move

CWTICH

Language: Welsh
Where is it from: Wales
What does it mean: A hug--a safe haven given to you by the one you love

YA’ABURNEE

Language: Arabic
Where is it from: Lebanon
What does it mean: In English, the The literal translation is “you bury me” — it’s used to express the hope that your loved one outlives you, so you don’t have to endure the pain of living without them

FORELSKET

Language: Norwegian
Where is it from: Norway
What does it mean: A euphoric feeling experienced when you first start falling in love

IKTSUARPOK

Language: Inuit
Where is it from: Greenland
What does it mean: The feeling of anticipation when waiting for someone to come over to your home

VIRAAG

Language: Hindi
Where is it from: India
What does it mean: The emotional pain felt due to being away from the one you love

CAFUNÉ

Language: Portugese
Where is it from: Brazil
What does it mean: The motion of running your fingers through your beloved’s hair

OODAL

Language: Tamil
Where is it from: Sri Lanka
What does it mean: The act of fake sulking after getting into a trivial argument with your loved one

GIGIL

Language: Tagalog
Where is it from: Philippines
What does it mean: The desire to pinch or squeeze something that is overwhelmingly cute

FLECHAZO

Language: Spanish
Where is it from: Spain
What does it mean: Feeling that you’ve been struck by Cupid’s arrow (when you have an intense connection with someone)

REBECCA WOJNO, CONTRIBUTOR
Rebecca is passionate about reading, cooking, and learning about people doing good in the world. She especially loves writing about wellness, personal growth, and relationships.

ADD A COMMENT