5 Classic Books from Literature Class That Are Actually Great Fun [LIST]

Revisit delightful books from your past

Apr 8, 2014
Special Collections: READING FOR THE SOUL

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Some of you may have memories of sitting in English literature class poring over classics. At the time, the required reading might have seemed more like a chore and less like a pleasurable activity. But classics are called classics for a reason - the timelessness and relatability of their stories and plots withstand the test of time.
These five books are real treasures and are worth reading again – for fun.

1. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE
BY: J.D. Salinger
YEAR PUBLISHED:1951
SYNOPSIS: Holden Caufield is the narrator and protagonist of this coming of age story. Expelled from prep school and dealing with the passing of his older brother, Holden has an adventurous couple of days in New York City filled with insights and his struggles with transitioning from a child to an adult.
WHY IT’S WORTH READING: The Catcher in the Rye is a good reminder of how challenging it is to be a teenager and the lifelong challenge to determine what is authentic and what is not.

2. THE LION THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE
BY: C.S. Lewis
YEAR PUBLISHED: 1950
SYNOPSIS: A magic wardrobe serves as a portal into an alternative world known as Narnia. The Pevensie kids discover the secret entryway, and their adventures begin to save the kingdom from the White Witch.
WHY IT’S WORTH READING: The first of a series of seven books titled The Chronicles of Narnia, the land of the never-ending winter is worth getting lost in again. The fight against good and evil mixed in with the superb writing of Lewis deserves to be revisited.

3. THE GREAT GATSBY
BY: F. Scott Fitzgerald
YEAR PUBLISHED: 1925
SYNOPSIS: The opulent world of the Roaring Twenties stars the mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and his love for the flighty and beautiful Daisy Buchanan.
WHY IT’S WORTH READING: The short but riveting novel transports readers to the high life of the rich and eccentric. Filled with love, missed connections and a bit of drama, this novella is a great way to reflect on the thin lines between the past, present and future.

4. THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN
BY: Mark Twain
YEAR PUBLISHED: 1884
SYNOPSIS: Set right before the American Civil War, this great American novel is narrated by the spunky Huckleberry Finn. Forced to live with his father, Huck escapes and meets Jim, a slave who is looking to find freedom in Illinois. The two travel in a raft along the Mississippi River, encountering colorful characters and hijinks.
WHY IT’S WORTH READING: The adventurous tale sheds light on a distinct chapter of American history and serves as a critical satire of racism and inequality.

5. LITTLE WOMEN
BY:  Louisa May Alcott
YEAR PUBLISHED: 1869
SYNOPSIS: This heartwarming tale follows the lives of four very different sisters, and takes the reader on their journey from childhood to adulthood.
WHY IT’S WORTH READING: Though written in the 19th century, each character possesses characteristics and feelings that make it easy to dentify with them, even today. The book also reveals what it means to be an independent woman, no matter what time period.

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