Why Philadelphia Added New Colors to the LGBT Pride Flag

More Color More Pride

Jun 26, 2017
The flag, hoisted outside City Hall during a recent Pride Month event, was created as part of the More Color More Pride campaign, which aims to make non-white LGBTQ people more visible. (Kelly A. Burkhardt Photography/City of Philadelphia)

The flag, hoisted outside City Hall during a recent Pride Month event, was created as part of the More Color More Pride campaign, which aims to make non-white LGBTQ people more visible. (Kelly A. Burkhardt Photography/City of Philadelphia)

In honor of PRIDE month currently going on in the US, various different initiatives to raise awareness and acceptance of the LGBTQ+ communities have taken place across the country. In addition to celebratory Pride festivals from north to south, hosts of LGBTQ+ organizations are pulling out all the stops this month - giving an extra push to their efforts, creating new perceptions, and generating support from all walks of life.

Specifically for PRIDE month, Philadelphia, PA added two new colors to the existing, iconic rainbow flag that has become synonymous with the LGBTQ+ community since it was designed by artist Gilbert Baker almost 40 years ago. The two colors - black and brown - were chosen to represent the people of color within the LGBTQ+ community as an all-inclusive message, specific to the city of Philadelphia.

Perched above the City Hall, the new flag is part of an initiative rolled out by Philadelphia's Office of LGBT Affair's most recent campaign dubbed More Color More Pride. It is another step forward in bringing people together while celebrating our differences in this modern age, one that by and large has the capacity to see changes happen right before our very eyes.

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ELIANNA BAR-EL, CONTRIBUTOR
Elianna has a background in English literature and psychology and works as an editor and freelance wardrobe stylist. She writes on travel, fashion, food and inspiring people.

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