15 Little Ways to Cheer Yourself Up

When you find yourself in a funk, here’s some tips on how to be kind to yourself.

Jul 17, 2020

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When you find yourself going through a tough time, remember to take a moment to care for your physical and psychological well-being. Sometimes all it takes is hitting the reset button, whether that means speaking to a friend, going for a walk, or spending time in nature.  Lift your spirits with these 15 little ways that help cheer you up.

1. Go for a walk
When you feel yourself in a panic, take a break and go for a walk outside. Walking not only does the body good, it also helps mental health, according to doctors

2. Soak in a warm bath
Create your own at-home remedy by relaxing in a hot bath. Even just 10 to 15 minutes of a warm soak has physical and mental healing properties.

3. Get some sunshine
If you’re feeling down, you might not be getting enough sunshine and Vitamin D. In fact, researchers are finding a link between lack of sun exposure and depression. So don’t forget to catch some rays each day to feel your best. 

4. Put on your favorite outfit
Clothes influence how people feel and interact with the world. Wearing your favorite outfit is an easy fix for a bad mood that will inspire confidence throughout the day.

5. Dance around
Human beings have always turned to dance as a form of therapy, from ancient Native American rituals and expressive meditation practices to modern dance/movement therapy. Put on some happy music, push the couch aside, and dance it out to feel better.

6. Watch a funny movie
The saying goes: “laughter is the greatest medicine.” It’s no joke! Laughter therapy reduces stress. So when you feel overwhelmed, put on your favorite comedy and enjoy a good laugh!

7. Do something creative
Studies show the connection between art and healing to restore emotional balance. Painting, writing, drawing, coloring — creative activities such as these provide a positive outlet for releasing emotional distress. 

8. Phone a friend 
If you find yourself in a negative thought loop, it can help to get out of your head and speak to true friends or to a relative who cares. Even just having someone listen to what’s on your mind alleviates stress

9. Spend time gardening
Nurturing plants has major benefits for your mind, body, and soul. A Dutch study found that tending a garden for just 30 minutes a day promotes wellbeing. You can start a small herb garden in your kitchen, or plant an outdoor garden. 

10. Drink a cup of tea
The healing herbs and flowers used in teas bring immediate anxiety relief. For the best results, simmer a pot of caffeine-free varieties like chamomile, peppermint, valerian, or lemon balm.

11. Keep a gratitude journal
Gratitude has scientifically proven benefits for improving emotional health and making you feel mentally strong. Keep a weekly gratitude journal by listing your blessings. This will help shift your focus away from the bad things so you can have appreciation for your blessings.

12. Do something nice for someone else
Doing good things for someone else makes you feel good, too. Buy a stranger a coffee. Donate to a charity. Cook dinner for a friend. Kind gestures such as these lead to greater happiness.

13. Exercise
Physical activity not only benefits physical health. Regular exercise also relieves stress and boosts your overall mood. Find an activity that you enjoy whether it is yoga, swimming, jogging, hiking, or a combination of them all.

14. Take a break
Studies show a strong correlation between lack of sleep and mood swings. If you feel down, you might just need to get some rest, even if that means taking a 10 to15-minute break during the day.

15. Drink more water
The brain is very sensitive to dehydration, and lack of water can cause drops in mood. If you find yourself feeling down, make sure you drink enough water. Doctors recommend at least eight eight-ounce glasses of water each day.

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ALLISON MICHELLE DIENSTMAN, CONTRIBUTOR
Working from her laptop as a freelance writer, Allison lives as a digital nomad, exploring the world while sharing positivity and laughter. She is a lover of language, travel, music, and creativity with a degree in Chinese language and literature.