8 Fantastically Healthy Fall Herbs & Spices to Plant at Home

Many people tend to shy away from growing spices at home, although they’re simpler to cultivate than we think.

Dec 7, 2018

Autumn is a magical time of year. The leaves are suddenly yellow, orange, and red, the pumpkin spice lattes are fresh, and apple picking is just an hour away.

Autumn also offers new foods for our palate- fall fruits and vegetables- like pears, butternut squash, and Jerusalem artichoke. Discussed less, but no less important, are the beautiful herbs and spices that grow during this dynamic season.

Herbs and spices offer incredible health benefits; add new and unique flavors to our favorite dishes, and can enrich our house with new sights and fragrances. Many people tend to shy away from growing spices at home, although they’re simpler to cultivate than we think!

When we plant herbs and spices, we also increase their health properties, because we pick them moments before we consume them; many times, we even add our own unique flavor to these herbs because we grow them more mindfully than a conventional farmer does.

Check out the list below of 8 fall herbs and spices to plant this season!

1. Sage

This miraculous plant has been used for thousands of years for its health benefits and its distinctive ability to purify spaces. Because of its potent characterizes, critters are not keen on consuming your plant, so there’s usually very little maintenance involved in its preservation. Drink it in tea, burn it as incense, or throw it in your pasta.

2. Ginger

  1. Ginger can be planted both indoors or outdoors, and is a versatile, powerful, and delicious addition to dishes. Ginger is an ancient elixir known to reduce nausea, muscle pain, inflammation, and reduce blood sugar. Throw it in Asian dishes, such as stir-fries and curries, in soup for a fun zest, or in a shake for an extra kick.

3. Rosemary

Rosemary is another low-maintenance plant that often grows wild, meaning you won’t need much fertilizer or pesticide to make it happy. Rosemary is ideal for its relaxing aroma and antiseptic properties, and is delicious infused in olive oil, scattered on potatoes, or cooked into focaccia.

4. Tumeric

Tumeric is another powerful and ancient spice that has been used in traditional medicine for its array of benefits, such as fighting inflammation, free radicals, and increasing brain function. Plant turmeric an inch or two into the ground with one of its bulbs immersed in the soil. Turmeric is great in soups, stews, and noodles.

5. Cilantro

Cilantro has an incredible ability to help the body detox of heavy metals. Make sure soil is moist and well-drained. These two herbs add an earthy kick to dishes, and are fabulous both in its raw form (such as in salads and spreads) or cooked into soups and stews.

6. Cumin

Fall is the time to harvest these incredible seeds, but make sure to give your cumin a long and hot summer beforehand. Cumin is known for its digestive properties; iron density; and for its potential ability to fight diabetes. Sprinkle ground cumin on legume-rich dishes, such as lentil soup for ultimate flavor.

7. Thyme

Thyme is a hardy winter plant that grows wonderfully in well-drained soil, and near rosemary. Its an immune-boosting plant with antifungal properties. Throw it in a good stew to reap the best of its flavor.

8. Paprika

Paprika is actually made out of the skin of bell peppers and hot peppers! Dry the peppers in a dehydrator or in the oven on a low temperature, and grind in a coffee grinder to make a powder. Among the numerous health benefits that paprika offers, it can also treat skin problems due to its antibacterial properties. Heat paprika in oil to gain extra depth to this famous spice’s flavor.

These fall herbs and spices are bursting with flavor and health, and are easier to plant than we think! Whether they are store bought or plucked from your backyard, enjoy them fresh, and store them properly for the ultimate experience. Bon appétit!

HILLA BENZAKEN, CONTRIBUTOR
Hilla Benzaken is a dedicated optimist. Her happy place involves cooking, acting, gardening, and fighting for social justice. She writes about all things sustainability, innovation, and DIY.

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