This Backpack Is Giving Under-Privileged Kids a Better Life

The upcycled Repurpose Schoolbags are saving both the planet and our children's future

Jan 17, 2018
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Three African children proudly show off their new Repurpose Schoolbags

The Repurpose Schoolbags is much more than just your average backpack. The upcycled, waterproof, and solar-powered backpack, has the potential to keep children safe on their way to school and gives them an important tool to succeed in their studies and earn a better life.

The impressive project is part of the South Africa-based Rethaka Foundation, which helps ensure access to education for underpriviliged children. The organization, founded by Thato Kgatlhanye and Rea Ngwane, also aims to reduce plastic waste, utilize solar energy, and empower children to realize their ambitions.

And while the bags themselves are already inspiring enough, it’s their dedication to seeking out sustainable opportunities that “create a far-reaching impact for low income communities” that makes this female run company so special.

The sleek creations are made from old plastic bags and PVC billboards and fitted with built-in solar panels that charge during the students’ long walk to and from school. After the sun goes down, the kids can then use the bag as a light and continue their studies.

Kgatlhanye Ngwane found a way to combine several initiatives into one durable, environmentally friendly backpack that reminds kids they have a bright future ahead of them.

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REBECCA WOJNO, CONTRIBUTOR
Rebecca is passionate about reading, cooking, and learning about people doing good in the world. She especially loves writing about wellness, personal growth, and relationships.
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